kattil mekkathil temple

The Kaattil Mekkathil Temple at Ponmana near Chavara has the Arabian Sea on one side and the TS Canal on the other. Thousands of devotees from all over the country come to the tree to tie the sacred bells given to them from the temple. The devotees go round the tree seven times before they tie the bell onto it. At the seventh round, they make a wish and it will be fulfilled. The tree is covered with such bells tied by the devotees. The banyan tree’s weakest branches could not bear the weight of the brass bells and had even come down. The bells are blessed by the temple priest and given to the devotees for Rs 30 per piece. The temple also holds a “12 vilakku utsavam”, a festival lasting 12 days during which time devotees live on the temple premises in makeshift huts. Around 910 such huts have been put up for this year’s festival which will end on Friday. The Kaattil Mekkathil Temple at Ponmana near Chavara has the Arabian Sea on one side and the TS Canal on the other. Thousands of devotees from all over the country come to the tree to tie the sacred bells given to them from the temple. The devotees go round the tree seven times before they tie the bell onto it. At the seventh round, they make a wish and it will be fulfilled. The tree is covered with such bells tied by the devotees. The banyan tree’s weakest branches could not bear the weight of the brass bells and had even come down. The bells are blessed by the temple priest and given to the devotees for Rs 30 per piece. The temple also holds a “12 vilakku utsavam”, a festival lasting 12 days during which time devotees live on the temple premises in makeshift huts. Around 910 such huts have been put up for this year’s festival which will end on Friday. The Kaattil Mekkathil Temple at Ponmana near Chavara has the Arabian Sea on one side and the TS Canal on the other. Thousands of devotees from all over the country come to the tree to tie the sacred bells given to them from the temple. The devotees go round the tree seven times before they tie the bell onto it. At the seventh round, they make a wish and it will be fulfilled. The tree is covered with such bells tied by the devotees. The banyan tree’s weakest branches could not bear the weight of the brass bells and had even come down. The bells are blessed by the temple priest and given to the devotees for Rs 30 per piece. The temple also holds a “12 vilakku utsavam”, a festival lasting 12 days during which time devotees live on the temple premises in makeshift huts. Around 910 such huts have been put up for this year’s festival which will end on Friday.

The Kaattil Mekkathil Temple at Ponmana near Chavara has the Arabian Sea on one side and the TS Canal on the other. Thousands of devotees from all over the country come to the tree to tie the sacred bells given to them from the temple. The devotees go round the tree seven times before they tie the bell onto it. At the seventh round, they make a wish and it will be fulfilled. The tree is covered with such bells tied by the devotees. The banyan tree’s weakest branches could not bear the weight of the brass bells and had even come down. The bells are blessed by the temple priest and given to the devotees for Rs 30 per piece. The temple also holds a “12 vilakku utsavam”, a festival lasting 12 days during which time devotees live on the temple premises in makeshift huts. Around 910 such huts have been put up for this year’s festival which will end on Friday.

Incarnation Of Goddess
  • India has ever been the holy land of gods and goddesses. Since ages past, men and women kings and emperors, saints and sages here were worshipping the Lord not only as the omnipotent and absolute ‘one’ but also as the ‘one’ whose manifestations are varied and manifold and who possesses different names, forms and divine attributes. Bhadrakali is the popular form of Devi worshipped in Kerala as Sri Bhadrakali and Kariam Kali Murti Devi. In Kerala she is seen as the auspicious and fortunate form of Kali who protects the good. According to the Kerala traditions, the events described in the Markandeya Purana associated with Bhadrakali (her slaying of the demon Darika to liberate the universe from the evil) took place in Kerala, near Madayi in the Kannur District. Bhadrakali temples in Kerala commemorate this event during traditional festivals and Bhadrakali is worshipped as the daughter of Lord Shiva, from whose third eye she sprung to defeat the demon. According to the Markandeya Purana, her worship purifies the devotee and grants liberation from the cycle of birth and death.She is seen to protect the honour of women and to bestow all spiritual knowledge. In Kerala, she called Virabhadra her “brother” and refused to be treated by him when she was attacked by the deity Vasoorimala, who had marked her face with smallpox. She said that a brother must not touch the face of his sister. Thus, mild pockmarks are sometimes visible on her face in some Keralan depictions of her.
  • Bhadrakali is the popular form of Devi worshipped in Kerala as Sri Bhadrakali and Kariam Kali Murti Devi. In Kerala she is seen as the auspicious and fortunate form of Kali who protects the good.This goddess is represented with three eyes, and four, twelve, or eighteen hands. She carries a number of weapons, with flames flowing from her head, and a small tusk protruding from her mouth. Her worship is also associated with the Tantric tradition of the Matrikas as well as the tradition of the ten Mahavidyas and falls under the broader umbrella of Shaktism According to the Kerala traditions, the events described in the Markandeya Purana associated with Bhadrakali (her slaying of the demon Darika to liberate the universe from the evil) took place in Kerala, near Madayi in the Kannur District.
  • Thus Almighty the Eternal God was worshipped in different forms such as Brahma, Vishnu and Siva, and their consorts; representing specific divine attributes of the Lord. Ancient puranas have described that Siva and Sakthi were simultaneously worshipped from the period of Aryans and Dravidians. Vishnumaya took the incarnation of Bhagavathy to annihilate evil and protect the good in this world. She grants every wish of Her devotees and resides in their hearts in multifarious forms. This goddess is represented with three eyes, and four, twelve, or eighteen hands. She carries a number of weapons, with flames flowing from her head, and a small tusk protruding from her mouth. Her worship is also associated with the Tantric tradition of the Matrikas as well as the tradition of the ten Mahavidyas and falls under the broader umbrella of Shaktism.

വൃശ്ചികമഹോത്സവം

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